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Österreichische Zeitschrift für Kunst und Denkmalpflege Heft 3/4, 2005

ÖZKD 2005, Heft 3/4

Österreichische Zeitschrift
für Kunst und
Denkmal-
pflege, Heft 3/4 2005

Buch Kurzinfo

Titel: Österreichische Zeitschrift für Kunst und Denkmalpflege Heft 3/4, 2005

Erscheinungsjahr: 2005

Seiten: 185 Seiten

ISBN: AUT 0029-9626

Preis: € 7,50

Zu bestellen bei:  verlag.berger.at

Aus dem Inhalt:

Stefan Ulrich Krause
DAS EHEMALIGE AUGUSTINER-CHORHERRENSTIFT ST. DOROTHEA IN WIEN. KUNSTHISTORISCHE REKONSTRUKTION DER MITTELALTERLICHEN KLOSTERKIRCHE. 

Johann Josef Böker
DER SPÄTGOTISCHE UMBAU DER KLOSTERKIRCHE DER
KARTAUSE IN GAMING.

Martin Treberspurg/Bertram Chiba
DIE GEWÄCHSHÄUSER IM PRÄLATENGARTEN DES STIFTES ZWETTL.

Walter Kalina
DIE BRIGITTAKAPELLE IN WIEN 20 (1650/51). "...IN CAPELLA
A NOBIS NUPER IN SYLVA THABER INTER PONTES DANUBY EXTRUCTRA ..."

Mario Döberl
DIE JOHANNES VON NEPOMUK-STATUE VOR DEM WIENER MUSEUMSQUARTIER. EIN WERK ANTON DOMINIK FERNKORNS.

Rainald Franz
GOTTFRIED SEMPER UND DIE ANGEWANDTE KUNST – THEORIE
UND PRAXIS. ERLÖSUNG DER FORM AUS DEM ZWANGE DES ORNAMENTS, ERLÖSUNG DES MATERIALS AUS DEM ZWANGE
DER FORM.

Andreas H. Zajic
DIE KRIEGSBILDHAUER IM DIENST DES K.u.K. KRIEGSPRESSEQUARTIERS IM ERSTEN WELTKRIEG.

Angelina Pötschner/Elfriede Wiener
DER MENSCH HINTER DEM MÄDCHEN LI AUS DEN "TRÄUMENDEN KNABEN" VON OSKAR KOKOSCHKA. NACHLASSKONVOLUT
AUS DEM BESITZ VON LILITH LANG, VEREHELICHTE VON FÖRSTER (1891–1952).

Michael S. Falser
ZUM 100. TODESJAHR VON ALOIS RIEGL. DER "ALTERSWERT"
ALS BEITRAG ZUR KONSTRUKTION STAATSNATIONALER IDENTITÄT IN DER HABSBURG-MONARCHIE UM 1900 UND SEINE RELEVANZ HEUTE.

Imma Walderdorff
„INVENTARISIERUNG UND STILGERECHTE RESTAURIERUNG“: Die PRIMÄREN AUFGABEN DER INSTITUTIONELLEN DENKMALPFLEGE
IM KRONLAND SALZBURG.

Bruno Maldoner
BUILDING A LEGACY – BAULICHE DENKMALPFLEGE IN DEN VEREINIGTEN STAATEN.




ABSTRACTS
ENGLISCHE KURZFASSUNGEN DER AUFSÄTZE


STEFAN ULRILCH KRAUSE
The medieval Augustinian monastery of St. Dorothea in Vienna”

Until the end of the 19th century, this monastery complex of the Augustinian canons occupied the site of today’s auction house, the Dorotheum. The monastery was founded by Duke Albrecht V. in 1414; yet its origins can be traced back even further to a chapel under the patronage of the same saint dating from 1350. Over time, this once powerful bastion of monastic life seemed in danger of sinking into total oblivion. The secularisation efforts of Emperor Joseph II and the demolition of the old monastery complex to make way for the Dorotheum palace were not least responsible for this development. Recent research has now shed light on how the extensive complex of St. Dorothea must have appeared in the Middle Ages and has made it possible to study the architectural progression of the late-gothic monastery church. For the first time ever, historic photographs documenting the condition of St. Dorothea shortly before its demolition around 1900 are now being published.


JOHANN JOSEF BÖKER
The reconstruction of the Church of the cartusian monastery
of Gaming in the 15th century

In the mid-15th century, the Cartusian monastery of Gaming underwent a major reconstruction that was to change, in order to improve the acustic qualities, the spatial appearance of its church. This (explicitely stated) goal was accomplished by inserting a new vault some 25 feet underneath its original vaults. While all traces of this late Gothic rebuilding were erased by the subsequent Baroque remodelling of the church, a series of original working drawings could be identified that display the extent of the reconstruction by inserting the net vaults and their responds, the window traceries, the choir screen, the corresponding western gallery and the original tabernacle. Both technical and stylistic evidence allow the attribution of this project to Laurenz Spenning, 1456—78 cathedral architect at St. Stephan’s in Vienna.


MARTIN TREBERSBURG/BERTRAM CHIBA
Baroque Greenhouses at the Monastery of Zwettl

The recently completed restoration of the abbey gardens and greenhouses of the Lower Austrian monastery of Zwettl offers the ideal opportunity for presenting the architectural history behind them. The greenhouses were built in such a manner as to most effectively catch sunlight. This building-type, developed in the 18th century and especially common in Austrian abbey gardens, was used until the 19th century. A notable characteristic of these constructions is their large, slanted glazing directed southward and crowned by a protruding, arched plaster cornice which served to catch the sun’s rays. The greenhouses in Zwettl flank a two-storied pavilion located in the centre, the so-called Sommerstöckl. This complex was built by Josef Muggenast some time around 1722–1723. Though the pavilion has hardly been changed since that time, the architectural history of the greenhouses is much more complex. Their present-day appearance can be dated back approximately to the years 1834–1835.


WALTER KALINA
The Chapel of St. Brigitta  in Vienna’s 20th District (1650/51)

Two legends attempt to explain the foundation of St. Brigitta’s Chapel, located on the Forsthausplatz in Vienna’s 20th district. One maintains that the Emperor Ferdinand III received news of the Peace of Münster and Osnabrück on this spot in 1648. According to the other legend, the Archduke Leopold Wilhelm – the Emperor’s brother and the head commander of the Imperial troops – has just barely escaped the shots of the Swedish artillery on the exact same site while in his tent during the attack on the Wolfsschanze. Both of these legends, however, are without historical basis. While it is true that St. Brigitta was founded in the final stages of the Thirty Years’ War, it was erected originally as a votive chapel by Ferdinand III and as a place of devotion for the hunters and toll workers from the nearby toll house, located at “Am Tabor”. According to official contemporary documents, this small chapel was Filiberto Luchese’s first commission in Vienna and is not insignificant among his works. The chapel of St. Brigitta is a central construction which, in spite of its modest size, has nevertheless inspired many other works in the Austrian provinces.


MARIO DÖBERL
The Statue of St. John Nepomuk  in Vienna’s Museum Quarter

In front of the former Imperial stables in Vienna, the statue of St. John Nepomuk shows an inscription that until recently has led art historians to believe that this monument dates back to 1760. A later reworking was said to be the cause of certain historistic form elements found in the sculpture. Yet various documents, which have been made available only recently, show clearly that the statue is a creation from the year 1862, a work of the sculptor Anton Dominik Fernkorn, its base created by Josef Andreas Kranner. The statue, which at that time cost 1000 guilders, was funded by the residents of the stable complex. The present statue was preceded by an earlier work which was transported to the Imperial stud ranch Kladrub (Kladruby nad Ladem) in Bohemia after 1862. There it can still be found to the present day.


RAINALD FRANZ
Gottfried Semper and the Decorative Arts -  Theory and Practice

The article poses the question about the relation between Gottfried Sempers theoretical works and the objects realised according to his design in the field of the Decorative Arts. Semper developed his works out of a special relation he saw between Architecture and the Decorative Arts. In his theoretical works, he gave the Decorative Arts and „Art-Industry“ a leading role for Architecture and the other so called „High Arts“. The text tries to compare works designed by Semper from different fields in the Decorative Arts with relevant texts from his theoretical works like „Der Stil“ (1860, 1863). It becomes clear that theory and practical work were considered as a unity by Semper, who took up objects, realised by him as examples in his texts. His approach towards the Decorative Arts paved the way for modern architect-designers and even Modernists like Le Corbusier seem to have taken up his ideas. Semper stressed the need for a liberation of form from ornament and a liberation of material from the form.


ANDREAS H. ZAJIC
The Sculptors of the Imperial Wartime Press during WWI

Over the past few years, the work of the Austro-Hungarian "wartime painters" has repeatedly drawn the attention of scholars. Great effort was put into researching the activities of the Imperial Wartime Press concerned with reporting on the war. The heightened interest has familiarised us with the activities of the "art bracket" with its visual artists, photographers, and film staff. Despite this fact, until now little notice has been taken of the "wartime sculptors" and their work. The introduction of this article provides some information on the organisation of this "art bracket", a component of the Austro-Hungarian army. The article then turns its attention toward individual artists and gives examples of both their works and the scope of their activity. Finally, it aims to show the importance of the archives of the Imperial Wartime Press (Kriegspressequartier) in Vienna as a source for biographical and prosopographical research and also for studies in history and art history.


ANGELINA PÖTSCHNER/ELFRIEDE WIENER
The Bequest of Lilith von Förster, née Lang

Lilith von Förster, nee Lang (1891–1952) was closely related to the intellectual elite in Vienna of the early 20th century. Her mother Marie Lang was pioneering the Austrian Suffragette movement. Her parents and the family of her husband, the architect Emil von Förster, were in family relations and on friendly terms with many outstanding persons of Viennese culture. Oskar Kokoschka draw inspiration from her for his famous poem and picture book “Die träumenden Knaben” (The Dreaming Boys), published in 1908 by the “Wiener Werkstätte”, gaining her literary immortality by picturing her as the “Mädchen Li” (the girl Li). Her bequest comprises approximately 1500 documents and drawings by her brother, the artist Erwin Lang, correspondence by his wife, the famous dancer Grete Wiesenthal and exhaustive written material by the Köchert and Schey von Koromla families. It can be seen as a mirror of her personality and her social relations, allowing in depth information about the life and relations of key figures of the cultural life in modern Vienna of the first half of the 20th century.


MICHAEL S. FALSER
“Age Value” as a Contribution to the Construct of Nation-State Identity in the Habsburg Monarchy around 1900
and its Relevance Today


The present paper proceeds from the basic hypothesis that the discourse on the theory and practice of the preservation of public monuments reflects a cultural-policy construct of national identity or identities, and that, vice versa, processes of nation formation can be elucidated by reference to strategies of perception, evaluation and involvement with the national cultural heritage – including the principles of monument preservation. In the context of the homage paid in 2005 to Alois Riegl (1858-1905) on the 100th anniversary of his death, an attempt is made to interpret his monument preservation concept of “Alterswert”, or age value, against the cultural and political background of the multinational state of the Habsburg Monarchy around 1900, and to determine its current relevance to the process of the rapid expansion of the EU to the east. Two examples are discussed by way of comparison. The first, relating to the period around 1900, is the German Empire and the work of the German art historian Georg Dehio. The second, current instance, a humiliating event for monument preservation in Germany, is the demolition of the “Palace of the Republic,” a landmark of the erstwhile GDR in the center of the new capital of Berlin.


IMMA WALDERDORFF
The Preservation of Historical Monuments  in Salzburg:
The Early Days


The years between 1850 and 1911 represent the beginning stages of monument preservation on a national level in the crown land of Salzburg. This article aims to retrace this important initial phase. The two primary goals of the central commission were firstly to take an inventory of existing buildings and monuments and secondly to restore and preserve them. During this period it was possible to inventory the entire crown land, which remained the only Austrian territory whose monuments were fully registered until the First World War. Analyses of the chapel of St. Margaret in St Peter’s cemetery, the church of St. Blase, and the tower of the Franciscan church show how neo-gothic restorations from the mid 1860s have been carried out. These examples demonstrate how the restorations of that period were intended to remain “true to the original style”. Theoretically, the central commission’s involvement was obligatory in all measures of monument preservation. In practice, however, the commission was not consulted until the Franciscan church was modified in 1866. The assignments given by the central commission were certainly carried out on the one hand; at the same time these assignments, and ultimately the commission’s influence, were dependent on the cooperation and professional skills of the individual curators.


BRUNO MALDONER
Building a Legacy –  Monument preservation in the United States

Monument preservation in the United States is a complex issue thanks to the problems encountered and the methods to be applied, in combination with the size of the country and the variety of testimonies to a large number of cultures. The system that has developed on the basis of „grassroots“ and citizens’ initiatives is fundamentally different to the protective mechanisms in Europe organised by the central state. However, even in the United States, monument preservation does not prevail without the occasional application of governmental powers.
A historical summary sets out the role of committed citizens, in many cases women, and the provisions based on the American Constitution. A working basis has developed from a complex system of laws, standards, regulations, bylaws and formalised customs developed by practice and for practice and often applied very specifically but mostly with considerable caution by a wide variety of institutions. The way in which these are handled in local government authorities such as in New York City, where it has been possible to protect major buildings by law since 1956, has acquired specific forms. By including as early as possible high-quality works surviving in the original and applying expert preservation measures, their aesthetic appearance and their technical function are to be preserved without restriction and in authentic form.
The professional specialisation that can be observed is also to be found in monument preservation. For instance, in all sectors, a key role is played by the building conservator, whose work is supported by many specialists. The National Park Service (NPS) is a country-wide federal agency with large specialist powers. Many functions for the preservation and maintenance of the cultural heritage are carried out by a wide variety of non-governmental organisations (NGOs). The development of a “historical awareness” is combined with the effort to obtain a tangible “cultural heritage” for tomorrow.